Beagles At Work: Quarantine

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Beagles are one of the most worked breeds today. Because of their incredible sense of smell and their gentle nature and looks, beagles are used across a wide range of tasks in numerous avenues of society.

From drug and illegal imports detection to therapy dogs. From sensing epilepsy to work in movies and TV, you will find Beagles earning a living in many walks of life.

Beagles are used across Australia for various forms of detection work. They are often used because of the keen sense of smell but also for their ability to be trained to smell out target items. They are also used because they are often less intimidating to the public than other breeds. According to the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) web site “Beagles are chosen by AQIS as the breed of dog most suitable for the ‘friendly’ image of dogs working in public areas at airports and seaports”.

AQIS

The Australian Quarantine Inspection Service (AQIS) uses beagles in all their International air teminals, as well ans many of the domestic airports. They are also used in a number of sea ports across Australia.

The contribution of the beagle to maintaining a quarantine area cannot be measured. The team of beagles has inspected millions of passengers and have detected and intercepted thousands of accidental and deliberate importing of illegal goods into Australia.

Termite Detection

Beagles are now being used as a reliable means of detecting termites across the eastern states of Australia, where termites are a significant problem in destroying timber homes.

The beagles are trained to located through smell where a termite infestation may be occurring.

Location of Rare and Endangered Animals

In Australia beagles are being trained to locate specific species of animals. Often these animals are rare or endangered. The beagle locates the rare animal using is acute sense of smell. Once the animal is located, they can be tracked or monitored by wildlife agents.

2017-06-29T13:49:01+00:00 19 September 2013|Your Stories|